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Victor Marrero sold his 3,000-square-foot makeover house in 2009 and told local media his monthly utility bill ranged from 0 to

Victor Marrero sold his 3,000-square-foot makeover house in 2009 and told local media his monthly utility bill ranged from $700 to $1,200.Diane Korman, senior producer with the show, said the company emphasizes energy efficiency to help lower costs for families.Ed Hughes, county assessor, estimated property tax on the new home would ring up to about $2,100 per year.MOVING FORWARD Ultimately, Korman said, the show's goal is to build houses the families can keep for generations.This money can be used to pay off any mortgage on the property, so the family can own the house free and clear.According to Beaufort County public records, Bill Dickinson holds a $143,408, 30-year mortgage on the property, due in 2039.

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Victor Marrero sold his 3,000-square-foot makeover house in 2009 and told local media his monthly utility bill ranged from $700 to $1,200.

,200.

Todd Hawk, owner of H2 Builders, which led the local construction effort, said the home his team created for "Extreme Makeover" would sell for about 0,000 if it were put on the market.

But when the camera lights click off and the bus rolls on to the next town, not every family winds up with a happy ending.

Houses built for the reality TV show can come with extreme tax and utility bills, and some of the families selected for the show have battled foreclosure.

"Everybody was so enthused, they pitched in, and people went out of their way to be nice and be good," said Mayor Willie Oswalt.

"It was just great for this whole community." Oswalt pitched in, spending 12-hour days at the construction site for most of the week.

Oswalt said the property has bounced in and out of foreclosure three times.

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